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THE answer to Britain’s power supply is beneath our feet, writes Stuart Young. There has been much discussion recently about the unintended consequences of certain decisions, actions, or lack of action, regarding UK energy policy. Last autumn extensive media attention was devoted to the possibility of power cuts. That prompted me to look at the sequence of events leading to a once great nation not having a reliable electricity generation and distribution system. I found a number of unexpected...
Conducted by Stuart Young in collaboration with Dr George M Lindsay.
Published in the Times - Lewis Smith, Environment editor The oceans are losing the capacity to soak up rising man-made carbon emissions, which is increasing the rate of global warming by up to 30 per cent, scientists said yesterday. Researchers have found that the Southern Ocean is absorbing an ever-decreasing proportion of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The excess carbon, which cannot be absorbed by the oceans, will remain in the atmosphere and accelerate global warming, they said...
29/06/2007- The European Food Safety Authority's (EFSA) GMO panel has no safety concerns after reviewing data from French scientists suggesting toxicity concerns in rats fed the MON863 variety of GM maize from Monsanto. "Following a detailed statistical review and analysis by an EFSA Task Force, EFSA's GMO Panel has concluded that this re-analysis of the data does not raise any new safety concerns," stated the authority. The statement draws a line under the issue, raised when new data from a 90...
In his Autumn Statementthis week (a budget in all but name), George Osborne gave UK government support to increased R&D on new energy sources: “The government will prioritise energy security, whilst making reforms to meet our climate goals at lower cost. The government is doubling spend on energy innovation, to boost energy security and bring down the costs of decarbonisation.” The prioritisation of energy security is entirely consistent with Amber Rudd’s recent speech, which is a...
To no-one’s great surprise, the Energy and Climate Change Secretary, Amber Rudd, this week announced that the UK’s coal plants to be phased out within 10 years. That this was the government’s intention was never in doubt; coal had to go if the country was to meet its independently-set carbon budgets and agreed emissions reduction targets. However, the balance of what Ms Rudd said was really the more interesting facet of her speech. In particular, she made it clear that meeting climate change...
The UK Met Office this week issued a press release highlighting the news that the global average temperature this year is set to be a full degree higher than the pre-industrial norm (Warming set to breach 1C threshold, according to the BBC report). As we near the start of the Paris climate change summit, we can expect to see more stories like this. The only surprising thing is that the press release got relatively little coverage in the mainstream media. The implication of the report is, of...
The run-up to the annual Conference of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (or climate change summit, as it is more commonly known) sees plenty of reports, news stories and stunts designed to focus attention on the issue. The Paris event, due to start at the end of this month, is no exception. The latest story to hit the headlines is that the New York state attorney general has issued a subpoena to ExxonMobil – the world’s largest oil company – for emails and other...
In Alice through the Looking Glass, the White Queen famously said that she could believe six impossible things before breakfast. It often seems as though some people are following her example. Many things may be eminently desirable, but wishing for them is not the same as achieving them. Believing that a particular wrong or injustice can be completely eliminated often does no good. In too many cases, the best can be the enemy of the good. Poverty, for example, is one of the great scourges of...
Between now and mid-December, when the Paris climate change summit ends, global warming, sea level rise, extreme weather events, emissions controls and even ocean ‘acidification’ are all likely to figure regularly in the media. Studies will be released, commitments made and links – some extremely tenuous – will be made between continued use of fossil fuels and a range of negative impacts. Similarly, sceptical voice will be raised (though probably not at the BBC) in attempts to question the...

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